Raku-fired pottery

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The vase and small sculptured wizard (both pictured in the slideshow) were hand built using Feeneys white raku clay. My first exposure to Raku-firing occurred during pottery classes at the Potters workshop at East Gosford (on the Central Coast of New South Wales), where these pots were made.
The vase was created using slabs of rolled out clay, which were joined,  patterned and decorated. The top of the vase was made on a pottery wheel, then shaped to fit the rectangular vase and attached to form the neck. The handles were made from extruded, shaped lengths of clay.
As my first attempt, I was very relieved when this vase survived the extreme Raku-firing.
Showing the variety of colours which Raku-firing can produce – when reduction occurs – the wizard-like figure was assembled using rolled slabs of clay. The slabs used to form the coat were rolled in ball clay to cause the crackled pattern (which are visible on the sleeve).  Two pinch pots were made and joined together to assemble the head, extruded clay was used for the beard.

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Watercolour flowers

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Using small brushes for fine detail, these watercolour paintings were intended for use in greeting cards.
The ‘View from the window’ was painted in four sections, to suit a shaped card.
The ‘White flower’ was painted using washes, leaving a section of unpainted paper to highlight the flower.

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Creative Photos

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These photographs were taken by one of my grandsons.

  • Elizabeth Beach, south of Forster (New South Wales), is the setting for this awesome photograph of a seagull. Taken in the late afternoon, just as the wave was breaking on the shore, you can see the calm water receding before the foam of the next wave rolls in.
  • Shadows and footprints in the smooth sand made the perfect backdrop for this seagull, as it watched our approach seemingly unafraid.
  • I love this beautifully composed photo of our goldfish pond, combining shadows, movement and reflection.
  • This photograph of the wharf at Mallabulla, near Port Stephens (New South Wales), was also taken in the late afternoon. The sunset created a pink – nearly purple – glow over the calm water of the bay and even rendered the wharf a similar colour.
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Summer surprises

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Surveying my garden,  I was pleased to find many new flower buds.
The Polygala, ‘Little Polly’, has pretty mauve flowers and little feathery tufts that sit within its pea like flowers.
New buds on my miniature Agapanthus are a welcome sight, adding a touch of mystery as I wait for the reveal of their colour.
Periwinkle pink flowers are a mass of colour contrasting with the dark green leaves. Growing to a height of about 90cm, these cheery little flowers brighten up a section of the garden beside our driveway.
Soft new growth on the Indian Hawthorn is surrounded by leathery leaves.  Growing quite happily in a pot, our plant has many surprises as it produces new growth followed by pretty pink flowers, then seeds which change colour as they mature.

 

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Fairy houses

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My granddaughter and I built these little buildings – Fairy houses at leaf town – at the roots of a lovely old tree.  Not long after these photos were taken the chickens decided to scratch around the area with disastrous results.

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Pagodas

 

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  • This delicate fern blends in well with the rugged little pagoda.
  • The pretty ground cover is creeping towards this garden lantern.
  • A rustic house style pagoda, nestled between a Dianella and Chinese five star jasmine.
  • Bronze glazed and surrounded by a red Kalanchoe is this small pagoda.

 

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Some of my favourite plants

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  • Rhoeo have dark green leaves with a glossy purple colour underneath.
  • Bromeliads, dainty and colourful, are a wonderful addition to any garden.
  • Rhaphiolepis indica or Indian Hawthorn, with its beautiful pink flowers.
  • Mixed Succulents make a pretty picture.
  • Cordyline australis is an elegant plant which has strappy purple leaves.
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